Doug Stanton Discusses His New Book: "The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1968 Tet Offensive and the Epic Battle to Survive the Vietnam War"

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October 25, 2017 at the Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

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On January 31st, 1968 as many as 100,000 North Vietnamese soldiers attacked thirty-six cities throughout South Vietnam in an attack known as the Tet Offensive. This was a turning point in the decade-long war that led to, among other things, President Johnson’s decision not to run for re-election. It was a national watershed moment, but for 19-year-old Stan Parker and the young men of the US Army’s recon platoon, Echo Company of the 101st Airborne Division, the attack was the start of a brutal fight for survival.

As the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive approaches, The Odyssey of Echo Company offers a breathtaking portrait of war, homecoming, and a search for peace.

More than ten years in the making, and based on hours of interviews with soldiers, detailed letters written to and from Echo Company, Pentagon after-action reports, photographs and video footage, this new book by the New York Times bestselling author of In Harm’s Way and Horse Soldiers offers the untold and remarkable story of a platoon of American soldiers and their heroic efforts to survive the Vietnam War – both on the battlefield and after their return home to the US.

Doug Stanton is a journalist, lecturer, screenwriter, and author who has appeared on numerous TV and radio outlets, including NBC’s “Today,” CNN, Imus In The Morning, Discovery, A&E, Fox News, NPR, MSNBC’s Morning Joe, and NBC’s Nightly News, and has been covered extensively in prominent publications, including the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and New York Times. He has written on travel, sport, entertainment, and history, and his writing has appeared in Esquire, Outside Magazine, Men’s Journal, the New York Times, TIME, Newsweek, Slate, The Daily Beast, and the Washington Post.

Length: 00:53:17
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
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Doug Stanton Discusses His New Book: "The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1968 TET Offensive and the Epic Battle to Survive the Vietnam War"


 

Nerd Nite #49 - Psychology and Stimulation

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October 19, 2017 at Live! 102 S. First St.

About Kulky: Psychologist Kulky Nakai is more than a scholar, researcher, and clinician, she’s also a philosopher, creative writer, and entertainer who enjoys pushing socio-cultural boundaries and provoking common thought to the cutting edge. She recently launched her very own b/vlog and podcast titled “More To Be Revealed,” a space dedicated for exploring the unknown with a curious heart and a funny bone.

Contains explicit content.
Length: 00:34:50
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
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Nerd Nite Ann Arbor presented by AADL at LIVE 102 S First St.


 

#44 Ann Arbor Stories: Professor Foxy Truesport

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October 12, 2017

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aas-foxy_truesport.mp325 MBAudio

This is the story of Thomas Clarkson Trueblood—the first golf coach at the University of Michigan, one of the most respected orators in the world during the late 19th and early 20th centuries and noted professor --- of lovemaking.

Get to know Professor Foxy Truesport.

Music by Tunde Olaniran

Length: 00:10:41
Copyright: Copyright Protected
Rights Held by: Quite Scientific Records, LLC


 

Howard Markel Discusses His Book: "The Kelloggs: The Battling Brothers of Battle Creek"

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September 12, 2017 at the Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

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University of Michigan Professor Howard Markel, medical historian, and author, discusses his critically-acclaimed new book The Kelloggs: The Battling Brothers of Battle Creek as well as John and Will Kellogg, brothers whose lifelong competition and enmity toward one another changed America’s notion of health and wellness.

John Harvey Kellogg was one of America’s most beloved physicians; a best-selling author, lecturer, and health-magazine publisher; founder of the Battle Creek Sanitarium; and patron saint of the pursuit of wellness. His youngest brother, Will founded the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company which revolutionized the mass production of food and what we eat for breakfast.

Howard Markel, M.D., Ph.D. is the George E. Wantz Distinguished Professor of the History of Medicine, director of the Center for the History of Medicine at the University of Michigan, and editor in chief of The Milbank Quarterly. His books include "Quarantine!: East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892," When Germs Travel: Six Major Epidemics That Have Invaded America Since 1900 and the Fears They Have Unleashed, and An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted, and the Miracle Drug Cocaine. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Journal of the American Medical Association, and The New England Journal of Medicine. Markel is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Length: 01:17:00
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
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Howard Markel Discusses His Book: "The Kelloggs: The Battling Brothers of Battle Creek"


 

#43 Ann Arbor Stories: How the Hippies Almost Killed Football

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September 28, 2017

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aas-football_hippies.mp335 MBAudio

In 1970, one man tried to stop the University of Michigan and Michigan State from playing their annual football game. And he kind of had an argument. A story of rock music, drugs, sex, love-ins, college football and judicial precedent - fun for the whole family!

Music by Hollow & Akimbo

Listener Warning: Episode contains references to sex, drugs, and the Ann Arbor band The Seventh Seal which played music so mind bending that it drove people to riot.

Length: 00:14:45
Copyright: Copyright Protected
Rights Held by: Quite Scientific Records, LLC


 

Dining with Shakespeare

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March 19, 2017 at Malletts Creek Branch

Travel back into the culinary past and discover how Shakespeare and his contemporaries dined in the 16th century. Author and historian Susan L. Nenadic discusses 16th-century attitudes towards food, how food was obtained, and the many laws regulating food at that time. She considers foods eaten by people at the time that we do not, and foods that are still part of our 21st-century diet. Quotations from Shakespeare and recipes are included.

This event was cosponsored by The Culinary Historians of Ann Arbor (CHAA), which was founded in 1983 by Jan Longone and friends and is an organization of scholars, cooks, food writers, nutritionists, collectors, students, and others interested in the study of culinary history and gastronomy.

Length: 00:25:19
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
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Dining with Shakespeare


 

#42 Ann Arbor Stories: The Chameleon

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September 14, 2017

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aas-chameleon.mp344 MBAudio

You're going to hear a story about a man. It may seem too good and too weird to be true, but trust me—what you are about to hear is 100% real. This is the story of William Douglas Street, better known as The Chameleon.

Music by Shout Out Out Out Out

Length: 00:18:06
Copyright: Copyright Protected
Rights Held by: Quite Scientific Records, LLC


 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Martin talks to Jonathan Lethem and Kevin Dettmar, editors of Shake It Up: Great American Writing on Rock and Pop from Elvis to Jay Z.

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June 7, 2017

Jonathan Lethem and Kevin Dettmar's Shake It Up invites the reader into the tumult and excitement of the rock revolution through fifty landmark pieces by a supergroup of writers on rock in all its variety, from heavy metal to disco, punk to hip-hop. Stanley Booth describes a recording session with Otis Redding; Ellen Willis traces the meteoric career of Janis Joplin; Ellen Sander recalls the chaotic world of Led Zeppelin on tour; Nick Tosches etches a portrait of the young Jerry Lee Lewis; Eve Babitz remembers Jim Morrison. Alongside are Lenny Kaye on acapella and Greg Tate on hip-hop, Vince Aletti on disco and Gerald Early on Motown; Lester Bangs on Elvis Presley, Robert Christgau on Prince, Nelson George on Marvin Gaye, Nat Hentoff on Bob Dylan, Hilton Als on Michael Jackson, Anthony DeCurtis on the Rolling Stones, Kelefa Sanneh on Jay Z. The story this anthology tells is an ongoing one: “It’s too early,” editors Jonathan Lethem and Kevin Dettmar note, “for canon formation in a field so marvelously volatile—a volatility that mirrors, still, that of pop music itself, which remains smokestack lightning. The writing here attempts to catch some in a bottle.”

Martin’s interview with Jonathan Lethem and Kevin Dettmar was originally recorded June 7, 2017.

Length: 00:26:18
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library


 

#41 Ann Arbor Stories: Skyscrapers

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August 31, 2017

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aas-skyscrapers.mp329 MBAudio

Skyscraper is such an elegant word. Two decades after it was first used in print to describe Chicago's tall-building craze, Ann Arbor had its first skyscraper—the seven-story Glazier Building. Twenty years later, the 10-story First National Building went up. This is the story of some of Ann Arbor's first skyscrapers, it's tallest building and the 30-story behemoth that never was.

Music by Chris Bathgate.

Length: 00:12:20
Copyright: Copyright Protected
Rights Held by: Quite Scientific Records, LLC


 

#40 Ann Arbor Stories: Train Crashes

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August 17, 2017

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aas-train_crashes.mp325 MBAudio

Ann Arbor has a rich history of railroads and trains. So so much rich history. This is not that story. This is a story of the most spectacular train crashes in Ann Arbor's history.

Listener Warning: Contain references to train crashes, more train crashes and a canary named Bobby.

Music by Diego and the Dissidents

Length: 00:10:07
Copyright: Copyright Protected
Rights Held by: Quite Scientific Records, LLC


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